"I want my FREEDOM!" "Who said I wanted to be a GUARDIAN?!" "Haven't any of you ever had a DREAM?!" "I looked at him and I saw MYSELF!"

 

Jackunzel Evil/Possessed AU → Requested by disneydame88
↳ In which a day to spend with each other goes horribly, horribly wrong for Jack and Rapunzel.

Bonus short fic
↳ The walls around them glowed golden and blue as Jack and Rapunzel’s ice and magical flowers hung from them, giving the pair enough light to see where they were going. Rapunzel smiled at Jack—it was the first time in a long time they weren’t with Hiccup and Merida. 
✧ “Do you think they miss us yet?” Rapunzel asked, trying to keep her tone casual. Jack turned around, and Rapunzel was relieved to see that she wasn’t the only one extremely happy.
✧ “They’re probably just grateful that we’re gone. I’d bet anything that they wanted some alone time, themselves.”
✧ “Anything, you say?”
✧ That voice was neither Jack’s nor Rapunzel’s. The two of them turned to see nightmares standing behind them, sealing off the exit to the caves. Pitch stood with them, smirking all the while. Jack held out his staff while Rapunzel held her frying pan at the ready.
✧ “What’s this here? A date? Oh, dear me, I hate to interrupt—wait, no I don’t. So, I’ve found your newest weaknesses. Each other. Jack’s gone on from his dear, long-departed sister to the little flower, while Rapunzel here has moved on from the wanted thief to the boy who makes a mess wherever he goes,” Pitch taunted. The words struck both of them hard. Jack never got to watch his sister grow up. Pitch framed him for ruining Easter that year. Gothel often called Rapunzel her flower, she’d called Eugene the wanted thief. 
✧ “Leave her alone, and leave me alone,” Jack said, trying to be as calm as he could. Pitch shook his head simply, approaching Jack while signalling for the nightmares to hold Rapunzel at bay. 
✧ “You, Frost, said you’d bet anything that the archer and the dragon rider wanted their alone time. Suppose you were wrong…suppose, instead, the two of them merely despised you both and just wanted you gone to rid themselves of you two insufferable teenagers for a few hours.”
✧ “Don’t listen to him!” Rapunzel called, struggling to watch the scene before her unfold. “Jack, he’s lying! He’s trying to manipulate your thoughts!”
✧ “But what does she know?” Pitch countered just as quickly as Rapunzel’s pleas had come. “All she knows is how to end the lives of those she once loved. Her precious mother. The thief. And now, of course, it’s Jack Frost’s turn.”
✧ “Jack! No!”
✧ And just like that, Pitch, the nightmares, and Jack all vanished before her, leaving her completely alone. Rapunzel stood for a few moments, and then quickly began heading back in the direction of the exit. She had to get out of here, she had to get to the tower—she had to do something to help Jack.
✧ It was hours before Rapunzel would admit that she was lost, probably still ridiculously far away from the tower, from Merida, from Hiccup, and she had no snow globes. Hope was diminishing, and Rapunzel began to sink to the ground when she spotted him, crumpled in the grass a few feet away.
✧ “Jack! Jack, you’re okay!”
✧ The figure in the grass tensed up, rising to its feet. Then, slowly, it turned around, and the normally piercing blue eyes of Jack Frost were a  hideous yellow.
✧ Rapunzel tried to stifle the gasp that came at the sight, but it slipped anyway, and Jack caught it right away.
✧ “Surprised to see that Jack isn’t here?”
✧ “J-Jack…”
✧ “Jack is gone, Blondie.”
✧ Blondie. Pitch must have let him know to use that one. Rapunzel stepped back as Jack held out his staff in front of him, ice and nightmare sand swirling up and down through the rough wood. 
✧ “Jack, s-stop, r-right now…put the staff down. I-I know…y-you’re in there somewhere…”
✧ “I told you, and I’ll tell you again: Jack is gone. You sealed his doom the moment you fell in love with him, and the very second that he fell right back in love with you was the very second that he agreed to his fate.”
✧ “No…no, no, no, he’s still in there—”
✧ “Jack is dead, because of you.”

(Source: xxfangirlonfirexx)

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

mimswriter:

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.